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Suspension and Chassis Questions about your suspension? Need chassis advice?

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Old 05-23-2004, 10:40 AM   #1
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easy ways to repair brake line leaks

behind my left rear tire my brake line has a leak, when im under there and someone pushes the brakes you can see it squirt out in a fine stream. the hole is in the metal part of the line. does anyone know if theres an easier way to repair that other than replacong the whole line? as long as its safe ill try it.
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Old 05-23-2004, 11:38 AM   #2
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Not sure if this will work for brake lines, but you can get this clay-like stuff that's used by plumbers and HVAC contractors to plug leaks in water and steam pipes. It hardens very well, even when wet. The stuff does last a long time, but it's a temporary fix and you should get that line replaced ASAP.
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Old 05-23-2004, 01:18 PM   #3
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When it comes to brakes, there is no quick, easy fix.
The line needs replaced, but before you pull it out, be sure the bleed screw on the wheel cylinder/caliper is free, so it can be repaired/replaced if needed.
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Old 05-23-2004, 05:54 PM   #4
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yesterday i just finished up exactly the same problem that you have (a hole in the hard line , prob from rust)

i asked many questions and there are several ways to go about it, what i did was: cut of crapped up piece, buy a coupler and a double flare tool and flared the end that i cut on the car, then i bent a new small piece to fit. so far thats as far as i got i was trying to bleed them today but i had problems getting a clear piece of tubing to stay on the bleed screw.
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Old 05-23-2004, 07:49 PM   #5
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the easiest way is to cut out the bad section (back to good metal), get a small piece of new line and two compression fittings. Cut the new line to size and use a compression fitting at each end to attach. Compression fittings don't even require flaring of the line end. Just poke er' in and clamp er' down! Comp fittings are designed to handle the pressure of a brake system (as long as you splice in at a point with good clean metal).
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Old 05-24-2004, 09:10 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally posted by eddie jr
the easiest way is to cut out the bad section (back to good metal), get a small piece of new line and two compression fittings. Cut the new line to size and use a compression fitting at each end to attach. Compression fittings don't even require flaring of the line end. Just poke er' in and clamp er' down! Comp fittings are designed to handle the pressure of a brake system (as long as you splice in at a point with good clean metal).
yup. this is the easist safe way to do it. you just replace the broken section.

the clay pipe repair stuff, JB weld, and other such epoxy methods are NOT safe at all.


the "best" way to do it is to replace the entire line... but theres nothing wrong with just replacing the broken section.
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Old 05-24-2004, 11:35 AM   #7
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Don't use a hardener - that is not safe at all.
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Old 05-24-2004, 02:33 PM   #8
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I always thought compression fittings were not strong enough to hold brake pressure. I would pull the line out measure how long it is. Then go to the auto store and get a straight line with the same fittings on either end. Then bend it to fit, this way you have new fittings and tubing that aren't all rusty.
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Old 05-24-2004, 02:41 PM   #9
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Compression fittings might hold but are not the correct fix either, to repair a line correctly you`ll need to double flare the line and use a union to splice it in to the old part, again not the prefered way to do it and truly a lot harder than just changing the whole line.
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Old 05-24-2004, 02:54 PM   #10
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I just replaced all of my hardlines with stainless steel pieces. I got
the 7 peice kit for $199 from classic tube. Unfortunately I had to wait four weeks for them to make my lines. Perfect fit though. Also Inline tube makes them and can do it in 48 hours. Haven't seen thier stuff though.
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Old 05-24-2004, 02:54 PM
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